One craft, two languages

Unfortunately for English speaking crocheters there are two standards for writing patterns: Standard UK terminology and Standard US terminology.

Even more unfortunately they use many of the same terms but for different stitches. Could it be any more confusing?! Well yes actually, it could. Its really not uncommon for pattern writers to forget to specify which terminology they are using (this is rife in free patterns on the web especially!)

All of The Crochet Projects patterns are written in UK terminology and we give US translations in the abbreviations section.

Here's a handy guide to the different names for the most common stitches

 

UK Abbrev

UK Name

US Abbrev

US Name

Sl st

Slip stitch

Sl st

Slip stitch

ch

Chain

ch

Chain

dc

Double crochet

sc

Single crochet

htr

Half treble crochet

hdc

Half double crochet

tr

Treble crochet

dc

Double crochet

dtr

Double treble

tr

Triple crochet

RtrF

Raised treble front

FPdc

Front Post double crochet

RtrB

Raised treble back

BPdc

Back Post double crochet

 

If you are looking at a pattern and aren't sure which terminology its written in here are some tips so you can play detective.

The stitches used

If one of the stitches is single crochet (SC) or half double crochet (hdc) then you know that the pattern uses US terminology as these stitches doesn't exist in UK terminology.

How they talk about the number of stitches

In UK this is more commonly known as the tension, in the US as the gauge.

How they talk about the hook size

In the UK we tend to use the mm size and the US tends to use a lettering system. Here's a handy conversion chart for those.

mm

US

 

mm

US

2.5

C

 

4.5

7

3

D

 

5

H

3.5

E

 

5.5

I

4

G

 

6

J

Note: there isn't always a completely direct translation between the sizes but a 0.25mm difference in hook size really won't make much difference, certainly less than the individuals tension.


How they talk about the yarn used

If it mentions 4ply, DK, Aran or Chunky it is more likely to be in UK terminology. If it talks about fingering, worsted or bulky its more likely to be in US terminology.

Heres a handy guide for those

UK

US

AUS

4ply

fingering

4ply

 

sport

5ply

DK (double knit)

light worsted

8ply

Aran

worsted

10ply

Chunky

bulky

12ply

Super Chunky

Super bulky

16ply

 

I've added Australia in as another English speaking country. They generally use UK terminology but their yarn names are significantly different. Fun way to remember which English speaking countries are likely to use which crochet terminology: if cricket is an annoying insect you probably use US terminology, if its a game you play with a bat and ball you probably use UK terminology!

Like hook sizes these yarn sizes don't fully convert. If you want to delve really deep into this I love this table.

Spelling

If they use colour its likely UK and if they use color its more likely US.

How it looks

Once you get used to the stitches, you may often be able to tell from comparing the pattern to the picture which terminology they have used.

Previous Article Next Article

0 comments

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published

Recently Viewed